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BLACK PANTHER ART: EMORY DOUGLAS

London retrospective of Emory Douglas’ highly political and iconic visual branding from the 60s-80s. 

THE ICONIC EMORY DOUGLAS @ THE OUTSIDERS GALLERY

I can’t describe what meeting him means to me. I’m good for the year.

Catch the exhibition if you can :

http://www.dazeddigital.com/artsandculture/article/11138/1/black-panther-art-emory-douglas

zingha
Emory Douglas, “We Shall Survive. Without a Doubt” (1971)

afrodiaspores:


Headed with the phrase, “We shall survive. Without a doubt,” the image depicts a brilliantly smiling young African-American child wearing glasses and, in place of lenses, are images of the young being educated—we assume in Black Panther community schools. Atop his head is a floppy, zoot-style hat, emanating red rays quoted directly from Chinese revolutionaries…Typically in the Chinese source images, one would see the red rays emanating from behind Mao, the leader, but in his works Douglas links them to the children, granting them [as the] agents of change. 

Douglas got started in the Black Panthers while attending rallies at San Francisco State University and City College of San Francisco where he studied commercial art, art geared toward advertising.  He remembers learning from one of his professors that “you should be able to draw in a way that a child will understand.” …[He] chose a righteous path of arming people in low-income neighborhoods with knowledge as he provided kids with clothing and free vegetables.



zingha:
A cherished Freedom Fighter and Revolutionary Artist! I salute Minister Douglas.

Emory Douglas, “We Shall Survive. Without a Doubt” (1971)

afrodiaspores:

Headed with the phrase, “We shall survive. Without a doubt,” the image depicts a brilliantly smiling young African-American child wearing glasses and, in place of lenses, are images of the young being educated—we assume in Black Panther community schools. Atop his head is a floppy, zoot-style hat, emanating red rays quoted directly from Chinese revolutionaries…Typically in the Chinese source images, one would see the red rays emanating from behind Mao, the leader, but in his works Douglas links them to the children, granting them [as the] agents of change. 

Douglas got started in the Black Panthers while attending rallies at San Francisco State University and City College of San Francisco where he studied commercial art, art geared toward advertising.  He remembers learning from one of his professors that “you should be able to draw in a way that a child will understand.” …[He] chose a righteous path of arming people in low-income neighborhoods with knowledge as he provided kids with clothing and free vegetables.

zingha:

A cherished Freedom Fighter and Revolutionary Artist! I salute Minister Douglas.